Tuesday, May 24, 2016

hyper-reality links

---"At times I feel as though I’m in a bad science fiction movie where everyone takes orders from tiny boxes that link them to alien overlords." --Rebecca Solnit

---"11 Ways to Make a Video Essay" by Conor Bateman

---"Western Culture is built around ideals of individual choice and freedom. Millions of us fiercely defend our right to make 'free' choices, while we ignore how we’re manipulated upstream by limited menus we didn’t choose.

This is exactly what magicians do. They give people the illusion of free choice while architecting the menu so that they win, no matter what you choose." --Tristan Harris

---Hyper-Reality

---"as a private company, Facebook has no particular obligation to reveal the inner workings of its products. But Facebook isn’t shy about its ambitions (or successes): It hasn’t just upended journalism and advertising; it plans on upending the retail, telecommunications, and entertainment sectors, too, inserting itself not as a competitor but as an entirely new layer in businesses around the world. It’s building drones that provide internet access through lasers. Its black-box sorting now governs a whole variety of experiences, or even entire industries. 'It just works,' a selling point on your desktop, is less compelling at global scale. How does it work? How does the system serve up information? More important: What are we not seeing?" --Brian Feldman

---"Peekaboo! The Movies of 2016 at Halftime" by Dennis Cozzalio

---“In today’s world we are surrounded by gadgets. Our phones, televisions, fridges, everything around us is sending real-time information about us. Already we have full data on people’s movements, their interests and so on. A person should understand that in the modern world he is under the spotlight of technology. You just have to live with that.”

---"listening machines trigger all three aspects of the surveillance holy trinity:

1) They're pervasive, starting to appear in all aspects of our lives.

2) They're persistent, capable of keeping records of what we've said indefinitely.

3) They process the data they collect, seeking to understand what people are saying and acting on what they're able to understand." --Ethan Zuckerman

---"The Future is Almost Now" by Elizabeth Alsop

---The Art of Film Editing

---"Stillman’s movies are always half-glamour, half-thrift. He speaks on behalf of a lifestyle many will recognize as their own: One of cocktails and suit jackets, but also one of student loans and difficulties paying the bills. Hollywood seems to imagine every person in America as either a multi-millionaire or a beggar on the dole, as though anyone who reads the New Yorker owns a yacht. Stillman understands that many of us are somewhere in between. His heroes are the sort that have college educations but don’t have cab fare. Do they lead a life of luxury? No. But Stillman’s films know what it’s like to live paycheck-to-paycheck but still feel a little debonair." --Calum Marsh

---trailers for Personal Shopper, Our Kind of Traitor, Sausage Party, Ghostbusters, De Palma, Hell or High Water, Zero DaysBilly Lynn's Long Halftime Walk, and Into the Forest 

---Empty

---“Everything’s designed to be bland, homogenised, user-friendly. As someone says in the book (and I’ve used it before, I know, but it’s a slogan I’m going to keep pushing) the totalitarian regimes of the future will be ingratiating, subservient. No longer will it be Orwell’s vision of a boot stamping on a human face. We’ll have something highly subservient and ingratiating, where the tyranny is imposed for our own good. We see it all the time.” --J.G. Ballard

Monday, May 16, 2016

The Film Doctor's Eighth Anniversary

Eight years ago, the Film Doctor started posting reviews, including this one concerning Lost in Space (1998) starring William Hurt, Matt LeBlanc, Heather Graham, and Gary Oldman

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

split diopter links

---Cher on Kitsch

---"What Is a Video Essay?" by Paula Bernstein

---Citizen Kane: A Tribute from the Movies

---Writer's Block: a Supercut

---"18 photos that show how drastically making movies has changed in the last century" by Courtney Verrill

---"What do you prefer about the 18th century?

In terms of almost everything, I think it’s a superior time, for music, architecture, manners, thought. Not the movies. The movies from that time aren’t so good." --Whit Stillman

---Cinephilia and Beyond considers Dressed to Kill and All the President's Men

---11 filmmaking apps for the iPhone

---The 15 Split Diopter Shots in Blow Out

---"Owen Gleiberman’s recent memoir Movie Freak: My Life Watching Movies reminds us that popular criticism—hyphenated adjectives! exclamatory interjections!—has become a spasmodic parody of itself. But my four writers cultivated distinctive styles that still crackle unpredictably. Agee’s roundabout self-interrogations, Ferguson’s wisecracks, Farber’s sardonic hyperbole and understatements, and Tyler’s sidewinding coinages ('Hepburnesque Garbotoon') make their criticism permanently provocative. For me, each man’s sheer verbal panache is central to his appeal." --David Bordwell

---trailers for Microbe and Gasoline, Yoga Hosers, SnowdenAbsolutely Fabulous: The Movie, Tulip Fever, X-Men: Apocalypseand Approaching the Unknown

---Burn the Witch and  Daydreaming by Radiohead

---"The Feed Is Dying" by Casey Johnston

---Man / Woman / Mirror

---"A practical guide for making your first short film"

---"Sex and Sexier: The Hays Code Wasn't All Bad" by David Denby

---Mirrors of Kane by Joel Bocko

---“I think my stories always have to lead to a moment of grace,” Gerwig tells me after the shoot has wrapped for the day. We’d left Williamsburg for the Marlton Hotel in Greenwich Village, walking distance from Gerwig’s home. Margaux, the restaurant on the main floor, was quiet—too late for lunch and too early for dinner, so we ordered coffee (for me), tea (for her), french fries sprinkled with parsley, and crispy brussels sprouts (for both of us). “It’s the most resonant theme for me as a person.”

---To Make a Great Movie, You Need a Great Ending

---Balance

---"through the Apple Music subscription, which I had, Apple now deletes files from its users’ computers. When I signed up for Apple Music, iTunes evaluated my massive collection of Mp3s and WAV files, scanned Apple’s database for what it considered matches, then removed the original files from my internal hard drive. REMOVED them. Deleted. If Apple Music saw a file it didn’t recognize—which came up often, since I’m a freelance composer and have many music files that I created myself—it would then download it to Apple’s database, delete it from my hard drive, and serve it back to me when I wanted to listen, just like it would with my other music files it had deleted." --James Pinkstone

---The Eyes of Taxi Driver

---"The Teenage Heartbreak of Sofia Coppola's Mary Corleone" by Mayukh Sen

---Hitchcock's staircases

---"[Richard Kelly] focused on Southland, a film he began writing as a response to the 9/11 terror attacks and the Bush administration's reaction. The Virginia native and USC grad had been living in Los Angeles since the mid-'90s and began processing his anxiety and frustration via the ambitious script. Southland started as Kelly's take on the encroaching madness of the war on terror, juxtaposed with the birth of trash culture and a news cycle in which wars in Afghanistan and Iraq competed for airtime with Kim Kardashian's sex tape." --Tatiana Siegel

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

New Jack Kitty: 4 notes on the excellence of Key & Peele's Keanu

1) I've been annoyed all week because my regular job has kept me from giving Keanu the attention and the blog post that it merits. Captain America: Civil War will likely take over everyone's consciousness soon enough. Key and Peele deserve better than to have their modest but witty movie suddenly shunted aside, knocked out of the cineplex by the new battling superhero blockbuster.

2) To give a sense of the current comedic context, my wife and I recently attempted to watch Sisters on Blu-ray (and we normally like Tina Fey's and Amy Poehler's work). We could stand it for only 14 minutes and 46 seconds before we turned it off. Tina appeared to choose the more childish and immature of the two roles, but we found its posturing unbearable. When I pause to consider good Hollywood comedies that I've been recently, there's, uh, Tangerine? Bridesmaids (2011)? Welcome to Me was good, but I'm blocking most everything else.

3) By combining a contemporary gangster action movie with a cute kitten, Keanu succeeds. Keanu made me want to watch all of Comedy Central's Key & Peele. There's something fundamentally mysterious about the film. Isn't the repeated use of a kitten dodging gushing blood and gunfire in slow motion too obvious? My 70+ year old mother went to see it with her older cat-loving friends, and they loved it. About twenty minutes into the film, Clarence (Keegan-Michael Key) somehow persuades some serious thugs that George Michael was a heavy duty bad motha for dropping Andrew Ridgeley from Wham!, and no one has seen Andrew Ridgeley alive since. Simultaneously, Rell (Jordan Peele) encounters some wild drugged out people who happens to include a deranged-looking Anna Faris in a role that subverts every form of cameo that I've seen in other movies. Did you know that the filmmakers excluded Faris from Scary Movie 4 because she was seen as too old?

4) I'm not sure how. I'm sure why, but Keanu in its slightly wicked yet geeky way proved one of the best R-rated films I've seen this year. Usually, movies set in Los Angeles are an embarrassment to the industry. Critics have proclaimed that Key and Peele shouldn't have tried to extend their sketch comedy skills to a full-length movie. I respectfully disagree. Pro-feline anti-racial stereotype cinema has arrived. Will Forte even appears in Keanu as a charmingly dreadlocked drug dealer, and I was even willing to forgive him for MacGruber. That's saying a lot.  

Saturday, April 23, 2016

cafe links

---Michael Jackson, Prince, and James Brown

---100 Years / 100 Shots

---Tensions: On John Cassavetes' Gloria

---the VFX of Games of Thrones season 6

---"The stakes of moderation can be immense. As of last summer, social media platforms — predominantly Facebook — accounted for 43 percent of all traffic to major news sites. Nearly two-thirds of Facebook and Twitter users access their news through their feeds. Unchecked social media is routinely implicated in sectarian brutality, intimate partner violence, violent extremist recruitment, and episodes of mass bullying linked to suicides."

---Adult Swim: The History of a Television Empire

---Martin Scorsese on Framing

---"Barcelona: Innocence Abroad" by Haden Guest

---"How Nina Became a Disaster Movie" by Kate Arthur

---“After scientists started saying we were in the middle of a global mass extinction event and still nobody at any level did anything to try to stop it—that’s when I knew we were in the clear,” said Tillerson, remarking that, by that point, he had become certain everyone would just keep driving their gas-powered vehicles and running their air conditioners 24 hours a day no matter what. “There’s just no way people are going to start switching over to renewables at this point. Hell, even if the whole world demanded new fuel-efficiency standards today, they’d be completely useless now that we’re beyond the point of no return, so really, why even bother?”

“And thank goodness,” he added. “Everyone’s complete hopelessness about the whole situation really is the best thing that could have happened to us.”

---"Six Grabs at Purple Rain" by Adrian Martin

---a history of yellowface

---"Protect me from what Amazon suggests I want."

---Scenes Alike

---"The Creation of John Wayne" by Lincoln Spector

---"The tech world’s most important players have suddenly embraced Hollywood for two reasons. First, they can no longer ignore the massive success that Netflix and Amazon have enjoyed by producing exclusive, high-quality programming. Since transforming from a DVD–by-mail service into a purveyor of buzzy series like Jessica Jones and Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Netflix has morphed into a $40 billion business, amassed 75 million subscribers, and won Golden Globes and Emmys. Amazon’s forays into original video have helped Amazon Prime add tens of millions of new customers, according to analyst estimates, and awards of its own. This has stoked the competitive landscape. 'They are in awe of the clout Netflix carries with both consumers and media companies,' says Blair Westlake, the former chairman of Universal Television and head of media and entertainment for Microsoft. "None of the tech companies have anything that even comes close.'"

---trailers for The Handmaiden, Cafe Society, The Founder, Jason Bourne, The Girl on the Train, De Palma, The Magnificent Seven, Swiss Army Man, The Birth of a NationLove and FriendshipGreen RoomGuardians, The Neon Demon, The Family Fang, Our Kind of Traitor, and Suicide Squad

---Melancholia: Life Out of Proportion

---Taxi Driver Oral History

---"As smartphones and other mobile devices have become more widespread, some 21% of Americans now report that they go online 'almost constantly,' according to a Pew Research Center survey."

---"Only Angels Have Wings: Hawks's Genius Takes Flight" by Michael Sragow

---"Even if Tarantino wasn’t trying to make expressly feminist films, he still showed a marked attention to, and empathy toward, his female characters. However, this new Western phase of his career is re-directing that attention into a darker, angrier place, and curdling that empathy into a kind of cruelty that would be disheartening coming from any other filmmaker, but is downright hurtful coming from Tarantino." --Laura Bogart

---"In the Future, We Will Photograph Everything and Look at Nothing" by Om Malik

---DTCV  - Histoire Seule

---A24: Films of a Revolution

---"post a tweet, and everyone knows what you’re doing at that moment: idly looking at a screen, chasing after notice." --Teddy Wayne

 ---smoking in True Detective (season one)

---Scott Pilgrim: What's the Difference?

Sunday, April 10, 2016

The Unfortunate Notorious Allusions in Guillermo del Toro's Crimson Peak

Guillermo del Toro may not necessarily be interested in being subtle. I enjoyed the first third of Crimson Peak given its Age of Innocence portrait of Buffalo, New York, its lurid orange and yellow lighting, and its overall sense of maximalist aesthetics (with Jessica Chastain as the evil sister Lucille of Thomas Sharpe (Tom Hiddleston)). We quickly learn what she's capable of as she points out how moths eat butterflies before lowering a butterfly down to be crawled over in close-up by ants (a reference to the beginning of Blue Velvet (1986)). Relatively innocent writer Edith Cushing (Mia Wasikowska), i.e. the butterfly, suddenly finds her father's head mysteriously bashed in, so she rushes into the debonair Thomas' arms, and before one can say Jane Eyre she's swept off to the delightfully decrepit Allerdale Hall where the snow falls through the roof onto the living room floor, the plumbing tends to bleed instead of gush water, reddish ghosts appear in most scenes, and Thomas explicitly tells Edith to not go down to the wine cellar, I mean basement.

So far, so richly gothic romantic, but then I started to notice the Notorious (1946) allusions. Having taught the movie for many years, I find that Notorious (1946) is not my favorite Hitchcock (Psycho (1960) has more of a kick), but it's certainly one of Hitchcock's most restrained allusive movies, built much like a Mallarme poem in its willingness to suggest rather than overtly show anything. In comparison to most, Notorious is a model of civilized constraint where Cary Grant as Devlin need only gesture towards his suit coat to suggest that he may have a gun, Alicia's (Ingrid Bergman) most vulgar act is to swoon onto a chess-board like floor, and the evilest Nazi thanks his host for a superb dessert before doing anything offscreen as unseemly as kill someone while driving the poor man home. With Notorious, Hitchcock never overplays his hand; he merely hints, and somehow the movie gains in stature the more it hides its vulgar underlying drives and activities under consummate technique.

Yet, (spoiler alert), whereas Alexander Sebastian (Claude Rains) and his mother decide to slowly poison Alicia (using coffee) once he finds out that she's an American agent later on, Lucille Sharpe starts poisoning Edith (using tea) as soon as she arrives at Allerdale Hall. Why? Why not? It ramps up the drama. Soon enough, we see poor Edith sitting in a very Notorious-esque chair as she's impinged upon on both sides by both Thomas and Lucille. That chair, particularly, made my jaw drop. Does del Toro really want us to make all of the connections to Hitchcock's movie, or is he counting on us not knowing it that well, so he can make postmodern allusions with impunity? Later, when the kindly but bland doctor McMichael of Buffalo shows up unexpectedly in Cumbria England to save poor Edith after she falls several floors onto a lump of snow, I wanted to shout "Charlie Hunnam is no Cary Grant!"

Given the increasingly gory, bloody, ghostly, and lurid extravagance of Crimson Peak, every escalating Notorious allusion kept reminding me of exactly how much better Hitchcock's film is, and I can't imagine that that was del Toro's intention. By the end of Crimson Peak, even given its excellent set design, costuming, cinematography, and acting, I was reminded most of Tim Burton's less successful Gothic confections like, say, Sleepy Hollow (1999). Del Toro also makes a major allusion to Kubrick's The Shining, but with Notorious the cognitive dissonance became too distracting. Crimson Peak reminded me of The Hateful Eight (which invites similar comparisons to Stagecoach (1939)) in their compulsion to take everything too far in the third act, perhaps because both writer/directors (Tarantino and del Toro) are concerned about the easily distracted public turning to something else on their cell phones. It's enough to make one long for duller, more sedate classic movies.

Friday, April 1, 2016

The Superhero Files

---"The sabretooth Cat and the angry badger: X-Men Origins: Wolverine"

---"Green Lantern has all of the writerly interest of running one's hand through wet shallow mud in a ditch. It's like trying to get worked up about dryer lint. I did not hate Green Lantern as much as its trailer led me to think I would. In its blandness that kept reminding me of an advertisement for the Cub Scouts or a particularly toothless Superman remake, the movie doesn't merit hatred. It merits indifference that leaves me wondering about the the fundamental emptiness of the local Cineplex, the pointlessness of summer tent pole productions full of multicolored men flying around, signifying nothing." --"Studies in the Inane: 12 notes comparing a purple bottle cap with Green Lantern"

---"A poignant moment: two robots look soulfully at each other before one flies away." --"A Lot of Sturm und Drang signifying money: Iron Man 2"

---"For critics, the problem with Hollywood's superhero movies (and, perhaps, with its blockbusters in general) is that they are just fine. They are average. But they are average on purpose. They are the product of Hollywood's exquisitely designed factory of average-ness, which has evolved as the industry has transitioned from a monopoly to a competitive industry that can no longer afford to consistently value art over commerce." --Derek Thompson

---The Dark Knight Trilogy: A Retrospective

---"the cowboys of old did not labor under the same burdens as their masked and caped descendants. Those poor, misunderstood crusaders must turn big profits on a global scale and satisfy an audience hungry for the thrill of novelty and the comforts of the familiar. Is it just me, or is the strain starting to show?" --from A. O. Scott's 2008 "How Many Superheroes Does It Take to Tire a Genre?"

---an excerpt of Sean Howe's Marvel Comics: The Untold Story

---"Reading The Amazing Spider-Man comic books as a kid, I didn’t just take in the hero’s latest amazing feat; I wrestled seriously with his celebrated tagline—'With great power comes great responsibility.' Chris Claremont’s The Uncanny X‑Men wasn’t just about an ultracool band of rebels. That series sought to grapple with the role of minorities in society—both the inner power and the outward persecution that come with that status. And so it is (I hope) with Black Panther. The questions are what motivate the action. The questions, ultimately, are more necessary than the answers." --Ta-Nehisi Coates

---Batman v Superman Supercut

---"Tim Burton related Batman to things that were happening then—the fetish underground, the transgressive elements, the Gothic elements which were coming out of music as well. There was a real heavy punk element to the whole thing and Batman very quickly adapts to that; he was a black leather figure in a cave."

---"In Snyder's methodology, the death of a character has a name: The 'All Is Lost' moment. When a movie needs to convey a sense of 'total defeat' for its protagonist and its audience, Snyder prescribes administering 'the whiff of death.' He writes, 'Stick in something, anything that involves a death . . . [because it] will resonate and make that 'All Is Lost' moment all the more poignant." --Alexander Huls

---"The original 1941 Captain America comic was mostly concerned with persuading isolationist Americans into fighting Nazis. If one examines the ideological complexities of, say, the helicopter Ride of the Valkyrie scene in Apocalypse Now, one can uncover multiple attitudes towards the war that range from the gung-ho excitement of battle, to a recognition of war's absurdities and horrors, to a depiction of how the innocent suffer, to an acknowledgement of the deceptive tactics of the enemy, and so on. Given today's military-industrial complex with its budgetary bloat, its on-going ventures in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Libya, and its long history of 'collateral damage,' we should be aware of what lies behind what Captain America sells."

---"Batman Vs. Superman is where you go when you admit to yourself that you've exhausted all possibilities," says Goyer, who wrote the screenplays for Blade and its two sequels. "It's like Frankenstein meets Wolfman or Freddy Vs. Jason. It's somewhat of an admission that this franchise is on its last gasp." --James Greenberg

---"One of the main reasons I did Kick-Ass was I was just like, you know, the comic movies, the superhero films I’ve been watching, the superheroes are old! You know, Batman is from the ‘30s, and Superman ‘30s, and Spider-Man, Fantastic Four, Iron Man, they are from the ‘60s, watched them in the ‘80s. And I just thought, 'Gosh. Where is our modern-day superhero film? Where is our sort of post-modern look at all the movies that we all love?' I just felt too many of these films were regurgitating the same idea, so they are just not relevant to modern life in any shape or form. So I wanted to make a movie that I think kids are going to relate to."  --Matthew Vaughn

---"The problem isn't that the movies are product—most movies are product, and always have been—but that they can't be bothered to pretend they're not product. That's the difference between popular art and forgettable mass-produced entertainment: the mass-produced entertainment flaunts its product-ness, then expects us to praise even minor evidence of idiosyncrasy as proof that we are not, in fact, collectively spending billions on product. The marketplace rewards each new superhero movie with a reflexive paroxysm of spending, guaranteeing each $200 million tentpole a boffo US opening that follows a boffo international opening (the new release pattern flips the old one). It's an entertainment factory in which the audience is both consumer and product. Its purpose is not just to please consumers but to condition and create them." --Matt Zoller Seitz

---"I was inclined to dislike Man of Steel in advance. With all of its product placements (Sears, Ihop, Nikon), its 100+ promotional tie-ins, its air of corporate cooptation of our collective summer attention span, Superman's earnest, square pedigree, the silly red robe, the red booties, and the thought of film executives at Warner Brothers perspiring over their 225 million dollar investment in a crowded blockbuster season, Man of Steel makes for an obvious target of ridicule.

But, then again, I like many of the actors involved."

---"As part of his Dark Elf skullduggery, Malekith stabs Algrim with a dagger and then sticks a red Aether lava rock in the wound. This procedure causes Algrim to writhe and turn into molten lava with super powers. Wearing a rhino/Minotaur/bull mask on his head for dramatic effect, Algrim then frees the enemy warriors from their dungeon in the depths of Asgard, thus wreaking havoc on King Odin (a perpetually bemused Anthony Hopkins with a gold eye patch) and his warrior God kingdom. It's always something." --"Define worse": 7 notes on Thor: The Dark World and its villainous elves

---"How many of this year's blockbuster wannabes will devolve to two swollen muscle-bound color-coded figures duking it out WWF-style amidst a great incoherent splash of CGI lighting as great cities crash, burn, and die in the distance?"

---"Iron Man 3 makes most sense if one thinks of it not as a movie, but as the skillful marketing of a brand. Robert Downey Jr. lends his expertise as an actor to provide a mildly subversive human face to this product line, and in many ways his performance in the movie (as well as his equally important Comic-Con appearances, worldwide promotional tours, etc.) resembles that of a politician satisfying the demands of his constituents, or a film executive making a presentation to his stockholders."

---Captain America: The Winter Soldier main-on-end titles

---"Many of you liked The Avengers: Age of Ultron, didn't you? How many of you thought it was better than Casablanca or Citizen Kane? [the students didn't want to generalize that way]. Okay, let's start with Citizen Kane."

[8 out of 10 students liked it better than Citizen Kane]

---"The purpose of a movie in the New Abnormal is to establish a sequel and then a franchise. To get there, studios are looking for pre-awareness — which means starting with a superhero or comic hero or an established IP. That’s an intellectual property like Harry Potter or The Hunger Games, what we used to call a book. Something people have already heard of and will be excited about just because the movie exists. Movies based on an original idea, starting from scratch, are incredibly hard to market. You have to open them in America first and buy a lot of television time. Internationally, it’s completely impossible. An original idea — a drama, or a romantic comedy — can’t be sequelized. It’s a one-off. Now, a great script that’s execution-dependent can still get made by what I call the 'Mount Olympians,' by the five or so directors on the A list. Or they can get made as 'tadpoles.' But they are not commissioned any more. And that’s one of the saddest differences between the Old Abnormal and the New." --Lynda Obst

---"the changing bodies of Superman, Batman, and other superheroes of the DC and Marvel universes illuminate the ways the ideal male physique has evolved in American pop culture over the decades." --Maria Teresa Hart

--The Evolution of BatmanSuperman and Spiderman in Cinema

---"Penetrate a secret bunker, handily discover a secret organization, dodge the fireball of a rocket attack from multiple jets, learn that a major figure that we thought was good is secretly bad and mean, evade machine gun fire, fake a death, resurrect an unconscionable amount of characters from the previous film (otherwise you'd have to invent new ones), vaguely flirt with Black Widow (who takes an interest out of contractual obligations), make a jokey reference to Iron Man, hook the shield to the back of one's jacket, determine once again to save the free world from familiar enemies, make laconic remarks with humorous flying sidekick, jump off of buildings and cargo jets, and fight the masked enemy that has some secret connection to your backstory." --"Nostalgia in the Smithsonian Exhibit: Captain America: The Winter Soldier"

---Dark Knight links

---"I think that it is a different climate today. I do not think Oliver Stone gets JFK made today. Unless they can make JFK fly. If they can’t make Malcolm X fly, with tights and a cape, it’s not happening. It is a whole different ball game. There was a mind-set back then where studios were satisfied to get a mild hit and were happy about it; it helped them build their catalogues. But people want films to make a billion dollars now, and they will spend $300 million to make that billion. They are just playing for high stakes, and if it is not for high stakes, they figure it is not worth their while." --Spike Lee

---Art of the Title considers Deadpool

---"In his review of X-Men, Roger Ebert begins with an evocation of the mythological gods of Ancient Greece, and ends with a plea to die hard comic book fans, whom he wishes would 'linger in the lobby after each screening to answer questions.' Sixteen years later, viewed from a cinematic present overrun by the cape and cowl, Ebert’s words read as both prescient and portentous. The rise of the superhero blockbuster, beginning in earnest with the release of Spider-Man, in 2002, is comparably bifold, driven by two dissimilar but potent cultural forces: a civilization’s ancient, collective need for a self-defining myth, and the thoroughly modern drive to commodify that desire. Superheroes have become the contemporary American equivalent of Greek gods, mythic characters who embody the populace’s loftiest hopes, its deepest insecurities and flaws. Between 2016 and 2020, an estimated 63 comic book adaptations will receive a major theatrical release, with scores more scheduled to take the form of TV shows, videogames, and every saleable medium in-between. The public’s appetite for these properties appears blind and bottomless, its stomach willing to rupture long before it’s sated. If American culture is indeed in a state of decline, these are the stories built to survive its demise." --Carmen Petaccio