Wednesday, October 6, 2010

sweet links

---the world clock and the future of transmedia

---20 signs of economic collapse and the increasing number of old people

---Tony Curtis' life in clips and Arthur Penn's struggles against the Hollywood machine

---Mad Men real ads and the need to worship the brand name logo

---Hunter S. Thompson's cover letter for a newspaper job:

"As far as I'm concerned, it's a damned shame that a field as potentially dynamic and vital as journalism should be overrun with dullards, bums, and hacks, hag-ridden with myopia, apathy, and complacence, and generally stuck in a bog of stagnant mediocrity. If this is what you're trying to get The Sun away from, then I think I'd like to work for you.

Most of my experience has been in sports writing, but I can write everything from warmongering propaganda to learned book reviews.

I can work 25 hours a day if necessary, live on any reasonable salary, and don't give a black damn for job security, office politics, or adverse public relations.

I would rather be on the dole than work for a paper I was ashamed of.

It's a long way from here to British Columbia, but I think I'd enjoy the trip.

If you think you can use me, drop me a line.

If not, good luck anyway."

---the inside story of The Social Network and @onlythecinema's thoughts about the film

---Wes Anderson's top 12 Criterion favorites

---the complete Andy Kaufman files and @DCozzalio's appreciation of Albert Brooks

---heist films

---Chloe Sevigny's interview

---a map of online communities

---Influencers and why companies watch your every move in social media

---James Surowiecki considers procrastination:

"So a fuller explanation of procrastination really needs to take account of our attitudes to the tasks being avoided. A useful example can be found in the career of General George McClellan, who led the Army of the Potomac during the early years of the Civil War and was one of the greatest procrastinators of all time. When he took charge of the Union army, McClellan was considered a military genius, but he soon became famous for his chronic hesitancy. In 1862, despite an excellent opportunity to take Richmond from Robert E. Lee’s men, with another Union army attacking in a pincer move, he dillydallied, convinced that he was blocked by hordes of Confederate soldiers, and missed his chance. Later that year, both before and after Antietam, he delayed again, squandering a two-to-one advantage over Lee’s troops. Afterward, Union General-in-Chief Henry Halleck wrote, “There is an immobility here that exceeds all that any man can conceive of. It requires the lever of Archimedes to move this inert mass.”

McClellan’s “immobility” highlights several classic reasons we procrastinate. Although when he took over the Union army he told Lincoln “I can do it all,” he seems to have been unsure that he could do anything. He was perpetually imploring Lincoln for new weapons, and, in the words of one observer, “he felt he never had enough troops, well enough trained or equipped.” Lack of confidence, sometimes alternating with unrealistic dreams of heroic success, often leads to procrastination, and many studies suggest that procrastinators are self-handicappers: rather than risk failure, they prefer to create conditions that make success impossible, a reflex that of course creates a vicious cycle. McClellan was also given to excessive planning, as if only the ideal battle plan were worth acting on. Procrastinators often succumb to this sort of perfectionism."

---Seitz analyzes Fight Club's opening credit sequence

---the William S. Burroughs trailer

---tips on filmmaking: the reshoot, shooting outside, and Mike Newell's thoughts

---making Back to the Future

---lastly, Emerson honors Sally Menke's work on Inglourious Basterds

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