Thursday, September 15, 2016

post-fact links

---"Even those diehards are watching movies as part of a larger audio-visual diet that is in serious technological and cultural flux. I could easily say that Lemonade was the best movie I saw this spring and Stranger Things was the best movie I saw this summer, and if you reply that they’re not movies because they didn’t play in theaters or conform to a two-hour run time, I’d say you’re living in the past. The Hollywood studios still feel comfortable in that paradigm but they’re starting to look like the only ones. Maybe they’re the suicide squad." --Ty Burr

---“It’s just a clear indication of the marketplace where those high-end, niche art films just aren’t working globally,” said Marcus Hu, co-founder of independent distributor Strand Releasing. “Territories aren’t buying those kinds of movies anymore.”

---"Where are all our great romantic comedies?" by Liz Meriwether

---The Coen Brothers and Noah Baumbach discuss filmmaking

---"Wow" by Beck

---"the ultimate motivation of these performances is not to find communion or community, not with the other actors and not with the film audience, either. If there is a message to the audience in these performances, it’s best captured by one of Lawrence-as-Katniss’s final lines in the series as she describes her trauma nightmares: 'I’ll tell you how I survive it.'" --Shonni Enelow

---The Dark Knight: Creating the Ultimate Antagonist

---Roger Corman's filmmaking tips

---"Don't Wait. Write. Make a short film. Go to an open mike. Take an improv class. There’s no substitute for actually doing something. Don’t talk about it anymore. Maybe don’t even finish reading this essay." --Mike Birbiglia

---Kenzo World

---All the Slender Ladies: Body Diversity in Video Games

---"These movies didn’t just fail; they almost seemed to never exist in the first place, having been dismissed or disposed of almost immediately upon impact. And even if they did do OK for a weekend or two, they never reached beyond their predictable (and increasingly stratified) core audiences. Instead, they were dumbo-dropped into our ever-expanding cauldron of content, where they played to their bases, while everyone else turned to the newest videogame, or the latest Drake video, or some random 'Damn, Daniel' parody." --Brian Raftery

---On Set: Kristen Stewart

---Cinephilia and Beyond considers They Live

---trailers for Nocturnal Animals, Miss Sloane, Westworld, Too Late, and Guardians

---"How Snowden Escaped" by Teresa Tedesco

---"Instead of ushering a new era of truth-telling, the information age allows lies to spread in what techies call ‘digital wildfires’. By the time a fact-checker has caught a lie, thousands more have been created, and the sheer volume of ‘disinformation cascades’ make unreality unstoppable. All that matters is that the lie is clickable, and what determines that is how it feeds into people’s existing prejudices." --Peter Pomerantsev

---Richard Brody considers Hitchcock's Marnie and Marie Antoinette

---Dennis Cozzalio considers Elevator to the Gallows

---Dick Van Dyke sings "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" at a Denny's

---The References of Wes Anderson

---"Truffaut, in his interviewing, showed that a theory of composition could be lucently explained through process, that invention was not a happy accident but a habit of the mind. Hitchcock, in his replies, proved that the illusion of mainstream effortlessness rose from tiny choices made with intention and care. The legacy of their inquiry rests in today’s pop-cultural hermeneutics, self-reflexive television, probing podcast interviews. Hitchcock/Truffaut helped shape current creative life. But it reminds us, too, that art still holds mysteries beyond even the most vertiginous achievements of craft." --Nathan Heller

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